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By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

Picking up on my comments on medals in my last blog, for this issue I mention one of my favorite medals—struck for the 1838 bicentennial of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. Key in its production was John Allan, recognized today (in 2018) as the first rare coin dealer in America. He was a jack of all trades, in a way.​​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

Are you planning to attend the American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money convention in Philadelphia? I hope so. If you do, Stack’s Bowers Galleries has a lot of events—multiple auction sessions, a dynamic bourse setup, and the opportunity to meet, greet, and chat with our staff.​​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

As time permits, in recent months I have been creating the second edition of A Tune for a Token, to be published by the Token and Medal Society, which issued the first edition in 1975. Some news about this was given to the CoinUpdate website then picked up by eSylum, resulting in a number of e-mails coming my way.​​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

In the latest (2019 cover date) issue of A Guide Book of United States Coins, the 1892 and 1893 Columbian commemorative half dollars are listed at $310 each in MS-65 grade. Get set to be surprised! At the height of a boom in the coin market in the spring of 1990 a MS-65 1892 was valued at $3,850 and a MS-65 1893 at $5,000!​​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

As summer approaches officially on the calendar (but is here in reality for many readers), it offers the opportunity to catch up on numismatic reading. On vacation, in a comfortable chair with the air conditioner turned on, or on the back porch, reading about coins is a pleasant pastime. ​​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

As you read these words I am completing a manuscript for the Civil War Token Society, Engravers, Minters, and Distributors of Civil War Tokens. I first discovered the appeal of these tokens around 1953 when as a teenager I was building my mail-order rare coin business. Not long afterward I met George J. Fuld, author and leading light in the Civil War token series. George lived with his family in Wakefield, Massachusetts and taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1958 a visit with him moved CWT into the fast lane in my mind. George had on hand thousands of CWT that he had studied and wanted to sell. Included was his reference collection of Wisconsin store cards, many Raymond album pages filled with William K. Lanphear shop tokens, and other issues. I departed with a large inventory!​​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

Judith Graham of the syndicated column, "Kaiser Health News," had a column titled "Older People with Strong Reasons to Life Often Live Stronger." She could have added "and Longer" to the heading.​​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

I recently heard from Christopher McDowell, a relatively new on the scene Renaissance Man researcher, now editor of The Colonial Newsletter and a major contributor to the Colonial Coin Collectors Club (not to overlook great help with some of the research I have been doing for Whitman and Stacks Bowers Galleries) In this instance, he wrote to ask who authored certain parts of a long-ago series of sales. These were the suite of four catalogs for the Garrett Collection sold by Bowers and Merena Galleries from 1979 through 1981, consigned to us by the Johns Hopkins University. My reply to Chris included much of the following.​​

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