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By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist

The 1848-D Liberty Head half eagle has one the lowest mintages of the denomination at the Dahlonega Mint in the 1840s. Just 47,465 examples were struck, amounting to nearly 17,000 fewer half eagles than were produced the year before.  Though it was once considered to be somewhat common in the context of Dahlonega issues, modern research and population reports have identified the 1848-D $5 as a truly important coin. ​​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist

​The 1824/2 Capped Bust quarter is an incredible condition rarity among the early quarter issues of the U.S. Mint. Just a single die pair was employed to strike this issue, producing an estimated 16,000 coins according to series specialist Steve Tompkins.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist

Two distinct star punches were used by the U.S. Mint to produce Capped Bust Right eagles in 1799. Production began using a smaller star punch which likely broke before the end of the year, forcing a transition to a larger punch that would continue to be used for 1800 and part of 1801.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist

​The 1959 Proof Franklin half dollar is widely available in average condition but presents an incredible challenge at the highest levels of preservation and quality. 1959 marked only the second time the U.S. Mint produced more than 1 million Proof sets, and it was obvious that quality had been sacrificed to attain this figure. 

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist

The 1859-O Liberty Seated silver dollar is a favorite among specialists and type collectors, hailed for its overall superior production quality and general availability in Mint State. 360,000 dollars were struck at the New Orleans Mint in 1859, which marked the first time the denomination was struck at the facility since 1850. ​​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist

The 1805 Draped Bust quarter represents just the third year that quarters were made at the U.S. Mint and only the second year of the Draped Bust type. Five distinct varieties are known for the 1805 issue, employing four obverse and four reverse dies.  None of these varieties are exceptionally rare, and have ratings of Rarity-2 to Rarity-5-. Browning-3, as represented by the lovely Fine-12 (PCGS) example to be featured in our upcoming Collectors Choice Online Auction, has a Rarity-2 rating.​​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist

With production beginning in 1838, the New Orleans Mint was crucial in supporting the economic growth of the southern United States. New Orleans was a leading economic hub of the nation in the early 19th century, rivaled by only New York City.​​

By James McCartney, Numismatist & Assistant Production Manager

Collecting a Ryder-26 1788 Vermont copper can be a significant challenge for colonial collectors. Vermont specialist Tony Carlotto noted in his 1998 reference that it "is one of the classic rarities in the Vermont series. It is not a distinctive type or sub-type, but is genuinely rare." More recently, Dave Bowers suggests in his new (2018) reference that as few as nine examples might exist, saying "it is one of the well-known key rarities in the original Ryder listing."​​

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