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Rare Money Blog

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​Though neither pugilistic technique—be it in boxing or in MMA (mixed martial arts)—nor the idea of pay-per-view are anything new, these concepts weren't always the case in the world of combat sports and entertainment. Prior to the late 18th century, boxers generally stood still, attempting to land blow after blow on their opponent until one fighter was left standing; no attempts were made to act defensively or in anticipation.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​Upon hearing the famous pairing of William and Mary, one might initially think of the university located in Williamsburg, Virginia—an institute older than any other in the nation outside of Harvard. Alternatively, one might think of that university’s namesakes, the William and Mary who reigned in England at the time of the institute’s 1693 founding.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​Possibly better known now due to her association with a brand of chocolates, the Lady Godiva in Anglo-Saxon days was a noblewoman married to Leofric, the Earl of Mercia in what is now central England. Though the legend surrounding her is viewed today rather apocryphally, it nevertheless has survived for at least seven centuries at least in part because of its risqué nature.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​Following voyages from Europe to the New World in the late 15th and early 16th centuries, the influx of inhabitants necessitated currency that would allow for commerce more efficiently than merely transporting coinage from Spain and her main native mint in Madrid. Given the vast natural resources of precious metals in the Central and South American colonies, striking coins locally was an obvious choice. This was accomplished, most popularly and commonly encountered by the numismatic community, at the mint in Mexico City, but also at other colonial mints such as Lima, Guatemala City, and Potosi.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​An English gold coin first minted under King Edward III in 1344, the noble became a popular type with robust, intricate iconography on each side, similar to other contemporary gold issues circulating throughout Western Europe. The obverse—commemorating the English naval victory at the Battle of Sluys in 1340—features Edward standing facing within a ship, alluding to this maritime conflict. In his hands he holds a sword and a shield, clearly prepared for battle. A century later, Edward IV augmented this design by placing a rose on the side of the ship, directly below the standing monarch, to distinguish the type from its earlier brethren which had a different weight standard.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​​The British Commonwealth has spawned a seemingly endless array of coinages featuring the contemporary reigning monarch along with more indigenous iconography, allowing for a series of issues across the commonwealth of nations that feel similar yet is each different in its own way.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger and Kyle Ponterio, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​​With the holiday season coming into full swing and the 2020 New Year right around the corner, anticipation for our Official Auction of the 48th Annual New York International Numismatic Convention is building. The auction will take place January 17-18 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Midtown Manhattan. It will offer many highly sought after treasures from varied locations and time periods. This week, we feature a few items from the “Kyle Ponterio Collection of Cut and Countermarked Coins,” struck during Peru’s War for Independence.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

Gaius Julius Caesar, commonly known by his nomen and cognomen (the second and third parts of his name based upon Latin naming conventions) came to prominence as both a general and a politician in the middle third of the first century B.C., forming a triumvirate with Marcus Licinius Crassus and Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great) and leading many successful military campaigns in Gaul and Britannia. His great accomplishments in the latter area, such as victories in the Gallic Wars, allowed him to amass incredible popularity, among his troops and his loving populace, who heard of his exploits in far away terrain.

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