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Did you know that Stack’s Bowers sold the most expensive dime ever sold at auction? The 1873-CC No Arrows Liberty Seated dime sold for $1.84 million.

By Bruce Roland Hagen, Senior Research Numismatist

For several weeks we have enjoyed placing the many Thos. H. Law English gold coins being sold at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Chicago sale into their historical context. They were acquired as such and displayed in award winning ANA exhibits for that and other reasons. The catalog has now been mailed to our worldwide clientele and all 459 lots are currently available for viewing and bidding on our website (www.stacksbowers.com). The handsome full-color catalog is not only a testament to Thos. H. Law’s brilliantly constructed cabinet, but also contains an overview of the English monarchy from Plantagenet King Edward III until the currently reigning Windsor, Queen Elizabeth II (60 plus years and heading strongly towards Queen Victoria’s record tenure).

By Bruce Roland Hagen, Senior Research Numismatist

For several weeks we have enjoyed placing the many Thos. H. Law English gold coins being sold at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Chicago sale into their historical context. They were acquired as such and displayed in award winning ANA exhibits for that and other reasons. The catalog has now been mailed to our worldwide clientele and all 459 lots are currently available for viewing and bidding on our website (www.stacksbowers.com). The handsome full-color catalog is not only a testament to Thos. H. Law’s brilliantly constructed cabinet, but also contains an overview of the English monarchy from Plantagenet King Edward III until the currently reigning Windsor, Queen Elizabeth II (60 plus years and heading strongly towards Queen Victoria’s record tenure).

By Greg Cohen, Professional Numismatist and Consignment Director, U.S. and World Coins based on the lot description by Frank Van Valen, Numismatist and Cataloger.

Among famous numismatists, the name Louis Eliasberg stands tall, as the only person to assemble a complete collection of U.S. coins by date and mintmark. If this were his only feat, his collection would have been remembered as one of the greats. But combine the completeness with the stupendous quality associated with his collection, and it will forever be the greatest collection assembled. Our coin of the week, a bright shining star among the galaxy of stars in our Rarities Night Session, combines a key date from a perennially popular series, finest known status, and fantastic pedigree: the Eliasberg 1889-CC Morgan dollar, graded MS-68 by PCGS.

Did you know that Stack’s Bowers has earned or its key people have earned more Numismatic Literary Guild awards than any other rare coin firm?

Put your numismatic knowledge to the test and if you can name that coin! Check out next week’s eNewsletter for the answer. Can’t wait until next week? Visit Stack’s Bowers on Facebook or Twitter now for the answer!

Written by Q. David Bowers, Chairman Emeritus

As you read these words I am putting finishing touches on my presentation, “The Romance and Potential of Collecting American Tokens,” to be given at the World’s Fair of Money (ANA summer convention) this coming Tuesday, August 13, at 3:00 in the afternoon in the Stephens Convention Center, Room 13. The program will last 45 minutes, causing somewhat of a problem for me, as I could probably talk about the title subject for two hours and still have a lot to say. I have prepared some nice illustrations, anecdotes, and the like. Although the scheduling is a matter of happenstance, the time on Tuesday is the day before our auction of the John J. Ford, Jr. tokens begins, starting on Wednesday, then continuing on Friday. This is one of the greatest collections of tokens ever offered in the history of our hobby. John Ford thought if having one example of a scarce or rare token was desirable, having two or three was better yet and a half dozen still nicer! All of this translates into a lot of opportunity if you are an advanced collector. If you are not a specialist in tokens, now is an ideal time to get started. The extensive descriptions are very informative. These and the illustrations will give you a good idea of each piece. With regard to background, apart from the catalog listings, the Internet has extensive details on many of the tokens listed.

By Harvey G. Stack, Senior Numismatic Consultant

Part 3: Presenting the Walton Collection

When the time came for Stack’s to present the George O. Walton Collection at auction, my cousin Norman and I were given the opportunity to catalog the Bechtler coins. There were close to 500 Bechtlers and we divided the group as follows: First we separated the A. Bechtler examples from those of C. Bechtler. We then divided these groups by denomination and then by variety including by die and wording variations. Although many were of varieties already listed in the Standard Catalog of U.S. Coins (Raymond) and the Guide Book of United States Coins (Whitman), new varieties and types were discovered among the Walton coins.
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