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By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​As we came to the last few months of 1983, Stack's continued to present important public auction sales. Our October sale featured the collection of Dr. Jerome S. Coles, (known as Jerry to his close friends and the Stack family). Jerry was a noted surgeon, who left his practice in 1946 to join the Philip H . Hunt Chemical Co. By 1950 he was the C E O of the corporation, one of the largest photographic chemical manufacturers, serving processing companies worldwide. Later Dr. Coles was Chairman of the Board of New York University Medical Center in New York, for decades

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​Stack's 1983 auction season continued with our March sale of ancient and world coins as well as a splendid general collection of United States gold, silver and copper coins. The sale contained over 1,300 lots and collectors participated in droves to find items on their want lists. The highlight was a group of U.S. silver dollars that featured 1836 and 1839 Gobrechts, 1851, 1852 and 1858 Liberty Seated pieces, and Carson City dollars from 1871, 1872 and 1873. The market was enthusiastic and we received a large number of mail bids as well as people participating in person.

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​1983 was a super year for Stack's. The markets got stronger, old time collectors had their confidence strengthened, and an avalanche of new enthusiasts seemed to enter the hobby, Stack's experienced a great growth in business, both over the counter and at our auctions, with overall results during this year that were outstanding.

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​Our stellar series of 1982 auction sales continued in March, when Princeton University consigned a substantial collection of world gold and silver coins to raise funds to expand a variety of library services. In addition, other consignments of United States coins brought the lot count for this event to 1,484 lots.

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​Despite the economic upheaval in 1981 and earlier years, the numismatic market seemed to withstand the uncertainties created by the sharp drop in silver on the precious metals market. While for a few years shows and conventions and the media were dominated by speculation in silver, most numismatic collectors and professional dealers who focused on the wide range of the hobby continued on as they had before this precious metals bubble. And while, of course, these people saw some losses when the silver bubble popped, they were small relative to those suffered by the speculators. Those dedicated to building collections of rare and important coins over a period of time found that their collectibles for the most part retained over 90% of their value.

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​As 1981 came to a close the strength of the coin market seemed re-established, fortified by Auction '81, and our Wayman and Bareford sales. To close out the year Stack's had a two-catalog sale in December. One catalog offered 1,100 lots of United States gold, silver and copper coins, while the second featured the Western Collection of United States Gold Coins, comprising an additional 205 lots.

By Harvey G. Stack

​As I wrote in my article covering 1978, Harold J. Bareford was a connoisseur of premium rare coins. He was willing to wait until he could find the proper example that pleased his discerning eye and passed his personal evaluation. During the decades he collected, he looked for the finest, and when he found it, he competed heavily to add each special coin to his collection. He owned many coins with lengthy pedigrees, for he felt that those who collected before him, who cherished beautiful, and rare coins as he did, also shared his goal of purchasing superior examples.

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​In 1981, public auction sales maintained some equilibrium on the market, and for Stack's the quantity and quality of the sales improved from January to December, indicating how the numismatic hobby was recovering after a tough start to the year.

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