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By James McCartney, Director of Consignments and Numismatics

While the earliest days of the U.S. Mint boast the greatest density of true rarities, even the modern era has its fair share of exciting treasures to encourage collectors adventurous enough to cherrypick. Though mintage figures confirm that no Jefferson nickel is rare in an absolute sense, populations dwindle to single digits when preservation and strike are considered. The master hub of the Reverse of 1940 had been in use for three decades before it was retired in 1970, and overall quality had been progressively waning during this period.​

By James McCartney, Director of Consignments and Numismatics

We are thrilled to feature an original and matched 1881 Proof Set in our Official Auction for the ANA World's Fair of Money this August, a group that is being offered publicly for the first time. The set offers incredible preservation and beautiful toning, highlighted by a magnificent Proof-68 (PCGS) CAC 1881 Morgan dollar in lot 4135 of our Rarities Night session. One of only 984 examples struck, it is tied at the top of the PCGS Population Report and ranks as the sole the finest seen by CAC. ​

By James McCartney, Director of Consignments and Numismatics

Beginning in 1877, the denomination listed on the double eagle was expanded from TWENTY D. to TWENTY DOLLARS, ushering in the Type 3 design that would be used until the series conclusion in 1907. These three decades witnessed some of the lowest mintages of the entire series, presenting numerous challenges for today’s collectors. The 1891 is one of these significant rarities among Type 3 double eagles, rivaling some of the legendary dates of the 1880s. During this era, the resources of the U.S. Mint were evidently focused on production of the new Morgan silver dollar, pursuant to the Bland-Allison Act of 1878. As such, production of double eagles dwindled, and the small numbers produced were often sent to Europe and much of it eventually melted. ​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

For the numismatist assembling a set of Saint-Gaudens double eagles, the later issues present a formidable challenge, even when the 1933 double eagle is excluded. Most were struck at the mints, then immediately set aside in Treasury vaults where they sat until the early 1930s when they were sent right back to the Mint for melting down into ingots. The 1927-S $20 is typical of these late issues and examples are very scarce in today’s market. The mintage of 3,107,000 pieces would ordinarily suggest a very common coin, but of these three million, only 3,750 were actually delivered to the Federal Reserve or to large commercial banks. ​

By Stack's Bowers Galleries

Stack's Bowers Galleries is pleased to present the Mickley/Norweb specimen of the 1827/3/2 Original quarter. This example, one of many exciting highlights of our Official Auction for the ANA World's Fair of Money, is graded Proof-65 Cameo by PCGS, and has been approved by CAC. Our catalog and website, StacksBowers.com, will feature an extensive history and description of this fabulous coin, but we present here a condensed history of this legendary rarity.​

By Stack's Bowers Galleries

Stack's Bowers Galleries is excited to present a newly discovered 1794 Flowing Hair silver dollar in their official auction for the 2021 ANA World's Fair of Money this August. Discovered in an accumulation by a southern UK dealer over 25 years ago, this piece is a newcomer to the census of known examples and was only recently authenticated with the assistance of Stack's Bowers Galleries. It subsequently received a grade of AU-55 from NGC and approval by CAC, ranking it among the most significant survivors of this historic issue.  ​​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

The 1951 Lincoln cent is an unassuming issue struck in the final decade of the Wheat Reverse design type. Over 284 million examples were struck in Philadelphia and at least 10% of those remain available to collectors. While low-grade examples can still be found in circulation, this issue is somewhat scarce in Gem grades and is a favorite among 20th century type collectors. ​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​As the first New Orleans Mint Barber quarter, the 1892-O has long been popular for those building mintmarked type sets. However, survivors are far scarcer than the Philadelphia Mint issue of the same year, and in the highest Mint State grades the 1892-O is a formidable condition rarity.

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