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By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​The post-World War II period saw an increase in American influence in global affairs, with President Dwight D. Eisenhower at the helm during his two terms in office. Having played a vital role in the allied victory in Europe the decade prior, Eisenhower provided a steady hand in this era when technology brought together a world that had so recently been severely fractured. Further advancements in aviation made visiting other world leaders faster, easier and more reliable; the call sign of "Air Force One" was first utilized at the beginning of Eisenhower's presidency in 1953.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​As the first great conflict to serve as a focal point for much of the world, it is not surprising that World War I is commemorated by means of medallic art. The countries on each side, whether the allies or the central powers, issued medals ranging from poignant to propagandistic. Solemn reflections upon lives lost and towns ravaged were commonplace, as were images of force and strength—even if not entirely accurate; the narrative, after all, was that which was most vital.

By Kyle Ponterio, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​The holiday season is a time of gift giving—a longstanding tradition that has taken place for centuries. There are countless reasons for the act of gifting, including friendship, love, peace, or simply respect. Gifts can come in all shapes, sizes, and forms, based completely upon the individuals involved and their relationship. Whether a physical object or a grand gesture, it is, in many cases, the thought put into the gift that is most vital. Precious numismatic objects that have been given as gifts appear in the marketplace with some frequency, but are usually of little significance or historical importance; for the most part they consist of medals, love tokens, or related exonumia.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​From talers to dollars, crown sized silver coins have always been a very popular with collectors. Given their size and the fact that they are generally the whole unit for their issuing authorities, crowns can play a vital role in shaping a narrative both domestically and abroad. A key aspect can be  ensuring the legitimacy of the ruling family and its future leaders. A German taler from the Kingdom of Bavaria in 1828 features King Ludwig's "blessings from heaven"—his wife and eight children, whose portraits all appear in small medallions upon the crown's reverse.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​In the late 15th century, the vast silver deposits in the Austrian realm of Tirol contributed to the need for a broader, thicker silver coin than had been produced in the past. This gave rise to the crown-sized issues that would become ubiquitous in the centuries to follow. As minting techniques progressed during the early modern period, scenery-rich designs could be executed, especially given this broad canvas. One of the driving factors—if not the driving factor—in western European life at this time was the Christian Bible and the passages contained therein.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​Even if you’re not a professor of art history or a dealer in the high-end art world, you’re likely familiar with names such as Picasso, van Gogh, Rembrandt, and Mondrian. Those appellations instantly evoke the artistic styles for which they are known and admired, and are an entire market in and of themselves. Within ancient numismatics, the practice of signing one’s work wasn’t unknown, with those who were the most accomplished at their craft leaving their signature to be recognized for centuries to come. One of the most celebrated among these classical artists was Euainetos, who flourished in the Sicilian city of Syracuse toward the end of the 5th century B.C.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​Award medals often combine the elegant and artistic elements of numismatics with interesting aspects of material culture, often relating the individual to whom they were awarded to a particular event in time. A prime example of this phenomenon is a silver medal featured in our January 2021 sale—an officially sanctioned auction of the 2021 NYINC. It was issued for the 1900 International Exposition held in Paris, France, a beautifully rendered medal by the hand Jules-Clément Chaplain, a key figure in the founding of the Art Nouveau movement. His obverse design is the head of Marianne (an allegory for France herself) facing right, wearing a Phrygian cap (emblematic of liberty) and an oak wreath, while an oak tree is in the background to the right, and a partial veduta of Paris is at a distance to the right.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​Having a native population going back some 60,000 years, Australia was first discovered by Europeans when the Dutch arrived in the early 17th century. A century later, the British arrived and in turn claimed half of the continent for themselves. The initial colony established there was New South Wales, and the British utilized this outpost as a penal colony to which the dominion's convicts could be sent. Not just prisoners would populate this southern realm, however, as the number of inhabitants in general grew rapidly in the late 17th- and early 18th centuries.

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