​​
Featured Vid​eos
See More​​​​
​​
​​ ​​​
Social Media
Blog Feed

By Frank Van Valen, Numismatist & Cataloger, U.S. Coins

Okay, so it’s not a Liberty Seated dime as we know them, but it’s still among the neatest and definitely one of my favorite items among all my exonumia pieces. This jeton is struck in white metal, and the steel gray devices and crinkly reflective fields form a pleasing cameo contrast. If I had to apply a grade it would be AU. A faithful reproduction of Gobrecht’s Liberty Seated motif makes up the obverse of this undated piece, with COMPOSITIONS – SPIEL – MARKE appearing around Liberty’s figure. 

By James McCartney, Numismatist & Cataloger

The 1850 Liberty double eagle represents the first year of production for the $20 denomination and remains one of the most popular issues for collectors today. Prompted by the California Gold Rush, the new double eagle was to serve as a convenient method for transforming bullion into legal tender in order to fuel the growing American economy. 

By James McCartney, Numismatist & Cataloger

Stack’s Bowers Galleries will feature a lovely Mint State 1867-S quarter dollar in its Rarities Night auction session at the official auction of the Whitman Coin & Collectibles Baltimore Expo in March. Warm amber-rose tones glow from the centers with deeper twilight hues in the peripheries. The fields are satiny and matte-like on each side, pleasantly smooth and untroubled. 

By Q. David Bowers, Founder

 

Here at Stack’s Bowers Galleries we all enjoy the honor and privilege of showcasing great collections at auction, including our current presentation of the D. Brent Pogue Collection Part III scheduled to cross the block as part of our partnership with Sotheby’s this coming February. I hope you can be there as a bidder and buyer or as an observer as history is being made.

By Frank Van Valen, Numismatist & Cataloger, U.S. Coins

The First Battle of Bull Run or First Manassas (depending on which side of the Mason-Dixon Line you found yourself on) was fought in the Washington, DC suburb of Manassas, Virginia on July 21, 1861. The first serious ground battle after the Confederate bombardment of Fort Sumter in April of the year, “Bull Run” aptly describes the Union Army as it stampeded as fast as it could away from the victorious Confederate forces who took the field that day. 

By James McCartney, Numismatist & Cataloger. Based on the lot description by Jeff Ambio, Vice President of Numismatics & Auction Catalog Production.

The 1840-dated Liberty Seated half dollars possesses a curious element of anonymity, in that they were manufactured at two different minting facilities, yet no examples were struck with a traditional mintmark. However, further research has shed some light on this uncertainty.

By James McCartney, Numismatist & Cataloger

While the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia had been striking gold coins since 1795, these quarter eagle, half eagle, and eagle denominations represented a large sum of money and were mostly used in large business transactions. Many were also sent abroad and melted to take advantage of the favorable silver–to-gold ratio. After four decades of this monetary hemorage, the Coinage Act of 1834, passed by Congress on June 27th and signed by President Andrew Jackson on the following day, raised coinage ratios from the antiquated 15:1 to a more relevant 16:1 silver-to-gold composition, effectively eliminating the advantages of exporting U.S. gold coins. 

By Frank Van Valen, Numismatist & Cataloger, U.S. Coins

My parents, John and Jeannette, were born in 1912. They began dating in 1928 when each was 16 years old, and they were married in 1930 when they turned 18. It was the height of the Great Depression, but by April 1936 they had four “Depression Babies.” World War II ensued a few years later, and then after the war – Mom and Dad had four “Baby Boomers,” including yours truly, number seven of eight, born in 1950. 

1234Next