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By Frank Van Valen, Numismatist & Cataloger, U.S. Coins

Benjamin Maximillian Mehl was born in Lithuania in 1884 and moved with his family to Fort Worth, Texas in 1896 when he was 12 years old. Working out of his family’s home on East 2nd Street, young Mehl began buying and selling coins. By 1903 he had taken his first ad in The Numismatist, and the following year he began a series of ads in the Fort Worth Telegram. 

By Q. David Bowers, Founder

More than 114 years ago this appeared in The Numismatist, contributed by Jonathan Oldbuck. Sounds like a nom de plume, but it is a bit too late to find out!

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

I became a professional numismatist, trained not only by my father and uncle, but also by Stack’s staff of experts and the collectors I met at our shop or at occasional numismatic shows.  Traveling was not as easy in the post World War II era as it is now, so I mostly stayed in New York City, where Stack’s was already a well known coin shop.

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

One question I hear quite often from beginning as well as advanced collectors is: "Why buy the book before the coin?".  The question often comes from Internet collectors, who seem to think of that as the only source of information. Well, the Internet is good, but at the same time it can’t offer everything.

By Q. David Bowers, Founder

The benefits of having a hobby, such as collecting coins, tokens, medals, and paper money, are many. Here is a comment from The Numismatist in March 1914.

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

In the early part of this story I told of the dedication and interest that R.L. Miles Jr. put into completing to the best of his ability his collection of United States gold , silver and copper coins. R.L. Miles, Jr. (known to his friends as "Skinny," a name he received while playing various sports in college) began collecting when he was a cashier in his family's Oyster business, and, using the Guide Book listings of his time, proceeded with the challenge to collect the varieties listed in that reference.

By Q. David Bowers, Founder

It is always interesting for me to read old publications and see what the “news” was in numismatics at various times. The following was taken from the September 1911 issue of The Numismatist:

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

Over the past few weeks I have focused on collector R.L. Miles, Jr. (called by the nickname Skinny) and his evolution from a change sorter into an advanced collector. He used the Guide Books of the 1950s and 1960s to decide which United States gold, silver and copper coins he would collect. In those days this annual reference listed the series as issued and some varieties that could be readily seen with normal eyesight
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