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Here is the answer to last week's test your knowledge! Did you pass the test?  Stay tuned for a new trivia question next week.​

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

When I left off last week I was discussing how the entire landscape of gold double eagle ($20) collecting was changed by first Franklin Roosevelt’s recall of gold coins in 1933 and by the examples that were eventually found in overseas banks and hoards in the 1950s and later. 

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

As I noted, rarities are virtually impossible to make. In contrast, a rarity does not always remain rare or even scarce. Just as an increase in demand affects rarity (as for the 1895 Morgan dollar discussed last week), a change in supply can make even a coin that had been nearly impossible to find possible, and sometimes even easy to locate.  

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

Here I continue my thoughts on rarities, and the factors that affect this important aspect of numismatics.

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

Like everything else in this world, coins are subject to the supply and demand system. If the supply of something is small to almost non-existent, even moderate demand causes a shortage. Desire for a certain item (in this case a coin) that has a limited quantity causes the price to go up, as there are not enough to go around. If a greater supply suddenly appears the price could drop, and if demand grows the value goes up. 

By Harvey G. Stack, Founder

Every hobby has rarities. In this way collecting coins is no different than collecting stamps, artifacts, paintings, trading cards or anything else.

In the early days of the United States politicians, ambassadors and wealthy individuals in America started collecting coins for education and pleasure.  People like the famous Adams Family who traveled to Europe extensively on diplomatic ventures brought home with them various coins of other nations and saved them.  

By Frank Van Valen, Numismatist & Cataloger, U.S. Coins

A superb Gem Mint State 1917-D Walking Liberty half dollar, graded MS-66 by PCGS and tied with four others as finest certified by that firm, is just one of many exciting offerings in our upcoming iAuction #3508. The new design type was in its second year when this beauty rolled off the coinage press in Denver, part of a mintage of 765,400 pieces. In 1917 the mintmark also appeared on the reverse, and nearly three times the amount was struck of that style compared to the obverse mintmark style. 

By Frank Van Valen, Numismatist & Cataloger, U.S. Coins

A spectacular and rare pattern 1869 dime in copper, Judd-710/Pollock-789, will be a focal point in our upcoming iAuction #3507. Graded Proof-65 RB by PCGS, this beauty exhibits a bold strike and exquisite toning highlights including coppery red with emerald green and peach undertones. Judd-710 is a Rarity-7- issue, with perhaps just a dozen or so examples known in all grades. 
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