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By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​With George Williams I went to an Empire State Numismatic Association (ESNA) convention in Syracuse, New York, in 1954. It was my first regional coin show. By that time I had been a regular attendee at the Wilkes-Barre (Pennsylvania) Coin Club, but had not ventured beyond that. George, a collector of the old school, lived in Kingston, Pennsylvania, adjacent to my home town of Forty Fort. He had been collecting for many years. When I met him he mentioned that Joseph Stack from New York City had come through the area on a buying trip and had offered him the irresistible price of $200 for his Proof 1895 Morgan dollar, and he sold it.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

Several weeks ago I invited readers to contact me about a curious token that has puzzled me and others for a long time. The inscription reads: LET THE EGLE FLY  / J.S.G.S.L.C.O. The reverse shows an eagle vertically, without legs or talons, with a shield on its breast. Seven stars are above. Below the eagle are seven stars, the date 1846, and 2 more stars.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​​In my column this week, I am sharing the following press release from the American Numismatic Association about a commemorative coin initiative that, if enacted, will benefit the ANA, as well as the National World War I Museum and Memorial and the Nevada State Museum (housed in the former Carson City Mint).

Friend and Numismatist Extraordinaire

​It was with great sadness that I and others learned of the unexpected passing of D. Brent Pogue, quietly in his home. I have had the privilege and honor of knowing and working with Brent ever since he entered numismatics in the 1970s, and in recent years all of us at Stack’s Bowers Galleries have partnered closely with him and his family in the sale by auction in five events, of his extraordinary collection of early American federal coins from the 1790s through the 1830s. Brent was the very definition of an extraordinary numismatist, a connoisseur. A careful student with a fine library at hand, he researched every coin he hoped to add to his collection.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​At the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Rosemont two weeks from now I invite you to track me down at the show and talk about anything on your mind—from consigning to an upcoming sale to research on something obscure in American numismatics. Or just to say hello.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​From the 18th century onward, countless coins were counterstamped with advertisements and messages. I have enjoyed collecting, studying, and writing about them. In recent times I have consigned quite a few to Stack’s Bowers Galleries auctions, where they have drawn nice bids. Counterstamps are hardly in the front line of interest headline-wise as they are relatively inexpensive—often valued at less than $100 and not often for more than, say, $500.  Among my favorite counterstamps is one that usually sells for $150 to $250 or so and is described within this blog.

Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Illustrated here are images of a fantasy bill or note datelined Washington City July 24, 1880. "Absolute Money for the sum of One Thousand Dollars, Redeemable nowhere," etc., etc. Series 59,843,702,086,231,787. The general distributor is B.F. Butler,  the buffoon nicknamed "Spoons" Butler who supervised New Orleans when the Union took it back from the Confederate States of America in 1862. Uriah S. Stephens, important in the founding of the Knights of Labor, is also on the note. ​

Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

For this week's blog I revisited some comments I made back in 2006, adding updates.  I had the pleasure of knowing Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr., the famous Baltimore numismatist who from 1925 to 1950 set about building a fine collection, eventually changing his goal to the ultimate: to obtain one of each date and mint and major type of United States coin ever struck.

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