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By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Gilroy Roberts served as chief engraver at the Mint from 1948 through 1964 after working as the top assistant to then Chief Engraver John R. Sinnock. He retired from the Mint in 1964 and went on to become an important part of the Franklin Mint, founded by Joseph M. Segel.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Adolph Weinman left a memorable legacy in the halls of numismatics. Today he is best remembered for his 1916 Mercury or Winged Liberty Head dime and the Liberty Walking half dollar that debuted the same year. The last was described as Liberty striding in Mint literature.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​There is no better way to begin this commentary than by quoting an excerpt from an  article by Paterson Dubois, “Our Mint and Engravers,”  which appeared in the American Journal of Numismatics, July 1883, pages 12-16: 

“William Barber, fifth engraver of the Mint, was born in London, May 2, 1807. He learned his profession from his father, John Barber, and was employed on silver plate work; he also worked for De La Rue & Co, in making dies for embossing cards and labels.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Today James Barton Longacre (October 11, 1794 – January 1, 1869) stands as one of the best remembered nineteenth century engravers at the Philadelphia Mint.  His most famous signature is the tiny letter L on the ribbon of the Indian Head cent. A bronze 1864 cent with an L is a key issue, and one lacking this letter is common.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Among American engravers of the past, Christian Gobrecht (1785-1844) is especially well remembered today. His name is associated with multiple coinage designs, none more famous than the Liberty Seated silver coinage of 1836 to 1873. The Liberty Seated Coin Club pays tribute to his accomplishments.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Charles Edward Barber became the sixth engraver at the Philadelphia Mint in 1880, following the death of his father, Chief Engraver William Barber; he remained in the post until his death on February 18, 1917. The Liberty Head silver denominations he designed and which are known as “Barber coins, were made from 1892 to 1916. Today they are very popular, and the Barber Coin Collectors Club gathers together specialists in the various issues. Perhaps the single most famous of his coins is the 1894-S dime, of which only 24 are said to have been struck.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Born in Philadelphia on August 26, 1909, the son of Bernard and Rose G. Gasparro, Frank Gasparro developed an interest in art at an early age and studied the subject at the Fleisher Art Memorial while still in grade school. He studied under Giuseppe Donato 1924-1929, who had worked with famous French sculptor Auguste Rodin. Enrolling in the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1928, Gasparro studied there until 1931, later taking advantage of two European scholarships (studying in France, Italy, Germany, England, and Sweden), after which he became a professional sculptor. 

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​The art and science of numismatics has enriched all of our lives. The gathering of coins, tokens, medals, and paper money and information and history concerning them is challenging and exciting. There are no bars to entry. If you aspire to collect one of each Proof double eagle of the Liberty Head and Saint-Gaudens types, it would be nice if you had bought Berkshire-Hathaway stock when it was $6 per share (today it is $338,500). However, not many of us did that.

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