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By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

As I discussed in my last article, in the late 1980s classic silver commemorative coins became a focus of the coin market, especially as people saw them as investment products, attracted by low mintages and generally high grades. Investors flooded the market and prices kept increasing, attracting more and more attention.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

If you've been following the coin market in recent years, you know that prices of federal coins in 1988 were, on balance, tiny fractions of what many pieces would sell for today. This is true across the board from colonials to Capped Bust silver coins, to large copper cents, to Liberty Head twenties, to—well, just about everything!

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

Recognized as a great rarity today is the membership medal of the Tuesday Club, a piece that revives the memory of life in the beautiful port city of Annapolis at the middle of the 18th century. On the Severn River near its entrance to the Chesapeake, the small village first settled in 1649 became the colonial capital in 1694.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

Born on December 11, 1879, Amon Gamaliel Carter, Sr., was a Texas oil man in the traditional style. Building on his success in petroleum exploration, he became publisher of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and a co-founder of American Airlines. By the 1930s he was one of the most prominent citizens of the Lone Star State.

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​In 1859 a new design was adopted for the cent, incorporating on the obverse Miss Liberty dressed in an Indian war bonnet, with UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounding, and the date below. The design was by Chief Engraver Longacre. 

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Perhaps since some of us are not going many places these days, it is a good time for a traveling quiz. Can you answer these five place-related numismatic questions?​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​Born on December 21 1877, Howard R. Newcomb became involved in numismatics as a teenager—the time that many if not most of the "greats" of our hobby got started. In August 1894 Newcomb attended the American Numismatic Association annual convention held that year in his hometown of Detroit, where he signed up to become member #227. He must have forgotten to pay his dues, for in The Numismatist in December 1906 he is listed as new member #92.​

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​​I have always liked large copper cents. First minted in 1793, they were made continuously until 1857, with the solitary exception of 1815. Back in the early 1950s I began to build a library of numismatic reference books, and by 1955 I had all the standard works, including Early American Cents, by Dr. William H. Sheldon (cent varieties from 1793 to 1814), published by Harper in 1949, and United States Copper Cents 1816-1857, by Howard R. Newcomb, published by Stack's in 1944.​

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