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By Stack's Bowers Galleries

 It is with great sadness we announce the passing of our friend and founder, Harvey G. Stack on January 3, 2022. His leadership over the years spearheaded our operations and his kindness and mentorship to staff, collectors, dealers, numismatic organizations and colleagues will never be forgotten.​

By Harvey G. Stack

​1992 was a major year of auctions for Stack’s. We started the year off in January with the Winter Collection, an extensive offering of United States colonial and federal coinage that included gold, silver and copper plus territorials and pattern and numbered 1,468 lots. 

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​In 1992 the growth of the numismatic market continued. More collectors started visiting our shop, ordering from us, and responding to our auction sale catalogs. In addition, more people were attending coin club meetings, and joining with other collectors at the various conventions all across the country. Our staff had increased, and some started joining Larry and me at many of the shows we attended. They had the opportunity to meet and chat with our clients. Business seemed to be gathering steam as each month passed.​

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​​​In 1991 the numismatic hobby really started to grow again, after years recovering from Black Monday in October 1987, when the market dropped about 20%. However, collectibles were able to hold steady in the market, as collectors and investors who had the extra money could purchase such items as a sign of wealth and a store of value.​​

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​As noted earlier, in 1990 Stack’s presented 11 separate catalogs for their auction season, again offering a wide range of numismatic items to meet the needs of all kinds of collectors. January started off with items from the James A. Stack, Sr. Collection, including an extensive and virtually complete set of United States dimes from 1796 to date, mostly in Proof and Mint State.

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​The year 1990 was one of renewed growth in the numismatic market. After the quick but major drop in the stock market in October 1987, it took until late 1989 into early 1990 for the market to regain what it had lost. Most businesses had been negatively affected and some had failed altogether. Some banks had failed, and many industrial stocks had difficulty surviving. However certain assets held their value or lost just a fraction of it. These were the tangible markets, such as precious metals, including jewelry. In a similar way the numismatic hobby was less affected than other businesses. It seemed those who had built collections, such as series of early federal issues and rare and unusual coins held on to their collections as a store of value, as well as a pastime they enjoyed and items they took pride in owning.​

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​​As our public auction schedule for 1989 continued, in July we again joined with our partners, as each firm presented 500 lots in the now very popular annual Apostrophe Auction – Auction '89. Once again, this pre-ANA event in conjunction with RARCOA, David Akers and Superior attracted a lot of attention and was attended by many who wanted to acquire some of the rarities we jointly offered. Our September sale of 1,685 lots started our fall session. This was a "something for everyone" sale that offered United States gold, silver and copper coins, along with U.S. paper money.​

By Harvey Stack, Co-Founder

​Stack's auction program for 1989 was large and important. This was the second year since the 20% drop of the Stock Market on "Black Monday," October 19, 1987. While things were recovering, it was a slow process. and the effects were felt for two years. This drop had been caused by the failure of the bond market to make promised payments and interest to many investors, leading to a wild sell off. During this period hobbies slowed down, but the numismatic market seemed to stay basically stable, as many collectors continued to enjoy the hobby and see coins as a store of value.​

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