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By Stack's Bowers Galleries

Stack's Bowers Galleries is excited to present a newly discovered 1794 Flowing Hair silver dollar in their official auction for the 2021 ANA World's Fair of Money this August. Discovered in an accumulation by a southern UK dealer over 25 years ago, this piece is a newcomer to the census of known examples and was only recently authenticated with the assistance of Stack's Bowers Galleries. It subsequently received a grade of AU-55 from NGC and approval by CAC, ranking it among the most significant survivors of this historic issue.  ​​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

The 1951 Lincoln cent is an unassuming issue struck in the final decade of the Wheat Reverse design type. Over 284 million examples were struck in Philadelphia and at least 10% of those remain available to collectors. While low-grade examples can still be found in circulation, this issue is somewhat scarce in Gem grades and is a favorite among 20th century type collectors. ​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​As the first New Orleans Mint Barber quarter, the 1892-O has long been popular for those building mintmarked type sets. However, survivors are far scarcer than the Philadelphia Mint issue of the same year, and in the highest Mint State grades the 1892-O is a formidable condition rarity.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

Measuring just 14 mm in diameter, the silver three-cent piece is the smallest silver type ever issued by the U.S. Mint in both size and denomination. Across all U.S. coinage, only the Type I gold dollar is more minuscule at 13 mm. As such, the silver-three cent piece is perhaps one of the more underappreciated series in the Red Book, even though it offers a rich depth of conditional rarity and challenging varieties.  Upon introduction in 1851, the new silver three-cent pieces, or trimes, circulated widely, primarily used for postage stamps as was intended.​

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

The 1796 is the only quarter featuring the Draped Bust, Small Eagle design, and it was also the only quarter struck for circulation in the 18th century. Production did not resume until 1804, by which time the Small Eagle reverse had been replaced by the Heraldic Eagle design.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​The 1861-S Paquet Reverse is perhaps the most famous collectible Type I double eagle and is recognized well beyond the specialists of the series. Anthony C. Paquet was born in Hamburg, Germany on December 5, 1814, and arrived in Philadelphia in 1848. In early 1857, he took up contract work for the Philadelphia Mint before finally being hired on as an assistant engraver. By far his most well-known work is the United States military's highest decoration for valor, the Medal of Honor instituted by President Abraham Lincoln on July 12, 1861.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​Produced toward the end of the Buffalo nickel series and with a relatively generous mintage of 10,300,000 coins, the 1935-S was well positioned for a high rate of survival in Mint State. However, the soft striking detail typical of many earlier San Francisco Mint issues also haunts the 1935-S. As such, coins grading MS-65 and MS-66 are more challenging to locate than one would assume. Above this level, the 1935-S becomes a conditional rarity with perhaps fewer than 200 Superb Gems known. 

By Stack's Bowers Galleries

Stack’s Bowers Galleries is pleased to announce that they will offer the finest known 1804 silver dollar August 12, 2021, in the Rarities Night Session at their official auction at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Rosemont, Illinois. The Sultan of Muscat-Childs-Pogue 1804 Class I silver dollar has been graded Proof-68 by PCGS, and is the single finest example of the “King of American Coins.”

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