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By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​With only 197,250 pieces produced, the 1911 Saint-Gaudens double eagle has one of the lowest mintages among circulation strike issues of the entire series. However, perhaps more important than the original mintage is how many coins actually survived the meltings of the 1930s. It is likely that just 4,000 to 8,000 1911 double eagles remain in all Mint State grades today. The vast majority are in grades of MS-60 through MS-64, including a large portion of the Mint State examples that have been repatriated from European bank hoards in recent decades.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​With a production run of 7,700,000 coins, the 1877-CC dime has long been a popular choice for type collectors seeking the smallest denomination struck at the Carson City Mint. It is readily available in most grades including lower Uncirculated, but it presents a significant challenge approaching Gem Mint State. Our March 2020 Auction features a desirable near-Gem example in lot 21496, certified MS-64 (NGC) and pedigreed to the E. Horatio Morgan Collection.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​The 1852 Liberty Seated quarter has a relatively low mintage of 177,060 coins, a steep departure from figures that were multiples greater throughout the 1840s and that went on to exceed one million coins regularly throughout the 1850s. This population was further diminished by melting in 1853 brought about by a favorable silver-to-gold ratio. Survivors are notably scarce today in any grade.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​The Philadelphia Mint struck only 1,100 silver dollars for commercial use in 1852, a fact that was not lost on contemporary numismatists. By the end of that decade, the 1852 had a reputation as a rare and desirable date in the silver dollar series. The Mint began producing Proof Restrikes around 1859. These coins are not official issues, but rather were offered privately by Mint personnel. Several striking periods are supposed, the first ending in 1860 when Mint Director James Ross Snowden supposedly seized the dies and sealed them in a carton.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​The Chapman Proof 1921 Morgan dollar is among the most elusive issues of the entire series, far exceeding in rarity the legendary Proof-only 1895. We are thrilled to offer one of very finest survivors from this clandestine issue in lot 3210 of our March 2020 Baltimore Auction. Certified Proof-67 (PCGS), it is the sole finest example on the PCGS Population Report and is numerically tied with just the Proof-67 * (NGC) example from the Duke Collection.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​Records indicate that the Philadelphia Mint struck 99 Proof double eagles in 1913, though just 58 coins were distributed due to the declining interest in the Matte, Roman and Sandblast finishes used since 1907. The finish used to strike the 1913 issue is actually unique within the Proof Saint-Gaudens double eagle series, being a bit coarser than the Proof 1911 and Proof 1912, yet a bit finer than on the typical Proof 1914 and Proof 1915. We are delighted to feature a superior example of this 1913 Sandblast Proof double eagle in the Rarities Night session of our March 2020 Baltimore Auction.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​We are thrilled to present a rare mint error large cent among the many early American copper highlights in our March 2020 Official Auction of the Whitman Coin & Collectibles Spring Expo. This 1800 Sheldon-209 cent depicts an obverse brockage, leaving in an intaglio impression of the obverse die on the reverse side of the planchet.

​By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​The early United States Mint practice of inserting silver plugs into half dollars and dollars to regulate their weights is perhaps one of the most romanticized techniques used to produce America's first coinage. It recalls an era of handcrafted workmanship and motivates today's collectors to examine their Flowing Hair coinage in the hopes of uncovering one of these surprises.

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