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By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

Upon the death of William IV—the third male child, and third overall, of George III—the crown passed to Victoria, his niece and the reigning Princess of Kent. Since the crowning of George I over 100 years earlier, the British crown and the German Hanoverian crown were in personal union. George I had been the hereditary elector of Hanover at the time he succeeded Queen Anne, this on account of his having descended from Sophia, the protestant electress consort of Hanover.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

​Juba was born in North Africa around 48 B.C., named after his father, Juba I, the King of Numidia. Shortly after the younger Juba’s birth, the elder Juba was defeated by Julius Caesar, after he had allied himself with Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great) in opposition to Caesar. Following this defeat, the kingdom was absorbed by Rome and became a Roman province.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

Darios I 'the Great' ruled over the vast Achaemenid Empire—the First Persian Empire—when its territory was at its greatest expanse, reigning from 522-486 B.C. Using modern geopolitical borders, the empire's boundaries ran from Northern Turkey (in the north) to Northern Africa (in the south), and from the Balkan nations (to the west) to Northwestern India (to the east). Given the size of this mighty entity, Darios divided the various regions into provinces, each of which were administered by satraps—essentially viceroys who ruled in place of the emperor.​​

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

​Following the early deaths of his elder half-brother Feodor III and his elder brother Ivan V, Peter achieved sole power at the helm of the vast Tsardom of Russia at the age of just 24 in 1696. To learn the best ways in which to advance his sizable yet fairly impoverished and somewhat primitive homeland, he traveled on a secret trip to Europe, working in shipyards and gaining insight into the various political landscapes across the west.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

After initially aiding Filipino rebels in their attempt to break free from colonial Spain, American forces remained on the islands, eventually engaging their former Filipino allies and challenging their newly found freedom. What ensued was more than four decades of American involvement in Filipino affairs, with the first three under fairly direct control of the United States government. Accordingly, the U.S. supplied the island nation with a new coinage struck at mints located on the American mainland.​​

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

​Along the lines of many of other Central and South American countries under yoke of Spanish rule, Paraguay declared independence from her colonial oppressors in May of 1811, although it would be governed by dictatorial and military régimes, along with pseudo-presidencies, for the next 60 years. During the extensive "presidency" of Paraguay's first president, Carlos Antonio López, the Paraguayan real was established as the nation's monetary unit in 1845, replacing the use of neighboring currencies.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

​​One of the world's more popular distilled spirits was created, somewhat comically, out of shortage of brandy, as explorers in the New World needed a replacement for their alcoholic beverage of choice. Following Spain's conquest and subsequent establishment of colonies in areas such as modern-day Mexico, soldiers and settlers quickly found themselves running short on products they were accustomed to, such as alcohol. Around 1535, with no grapes to be found, the Spaniards focused upon a different source of sugars for fermentation—the agave plant.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist & Cataloger

​The man who would be the father of not just a country, but more broadly of a good portion of an entire continent, Simón Bolívar was born to a fairly wealthy family in Caracas—then part of Spain's New World empire as the Viceroyalty of New Granada. Both of his parents died before he was nine, and the upbringing of the young Bolívar was left to the family slave, Hipólita, as well a tutor, Don Simón Rodríguez. It was under the tutelage of the latter that Bolívar developed a love for the ideals of liberty and freedom, as well as the enlightenment movement.

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